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From The Blog

  • How to Treat Shin Splints
  • How to Treat a Sprained Ankle
  • 16 Therapists Earn Advanced Certifications

A Step by Step Plan to Treat Shin Splints

Most athletes, at some point in their lives, have felt the agonizing pain of shin splints. But, what exactly are they and how can you get rid of them? We’ve spoken with Jeff Nelson, Certified Athletic Trainer and Director of Sports Medicine for SERC Physical Therapy, about the four steps to take to rid yourself of this painful and debilitating syndrome. “Shin splints” is the common term for medial tibia stress syndrome. They can be brought on by falling arches, muscle fatigue, stress from overuse, or improper muscle balance between the anterior and posterior aspect of the lower leg. “As an Athletic Trainer, I was constantly asked how to care for injuries. Often I would hear, ‘I slept on a heating pad and my back is still killing me’. So, I put together these rehab routines to provide general care guidelines for common sports injuries.” You can't always prevent injuries, but risks can be minimized. This begins with knowledge. Learning what to do and how to do it correctly, well, that is always appreciated by parents and athletes. There are abundant resources out there with conflicting theories, and some are contradictory. For instance, applying heat to a swollen area, or icing too long. Though performed with the best intentions, these “treatments”, in reality, can lead to further problems and injury. So, how do you care for shin splints?

*First, have the shin evaluated by your physician to rule out a possible stress

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How to Treat a Sprained Ankle

One of the most common injuries an athlete, or the average person, can incur is an ankle sprain. In fact, 25,000 people sprain their ankle every single day. While seemingly less debilitating than a broken bone, an ankle sprain can actually be quite painful for a lengthy amount of time, often lasting 4-6 weeks, or even longer if it’s a chronic sprain.

So, how should you care for an ankle sprain? How can you make it better, stronger and possibly not re-injure it?

We've spoken with Jeff Nelson, Certified Athletic Trainer and Director of Sports Medicine for SERC Physical and Hand Therapy about the steps you can take to feel better and move better, faster.  “As an Athletic Trainer, I was constantly asked how to care for injuries. Often I would hear, ‘I slept on a heating pad and my back is still killing me’. So, I put together these rehab routines to provide general care guidelines for common sports injuries”, explains Nelson. Most ankle sprains occur when the ankle rolls outward (eversion sprain), or the ankle rolls inward (inversion sprain). There are three degrees of ankle sprains: 1st degree (mild), 2nd degree (moderate) and 3rd degree (severe).Immediately, you should have the ankle evaluated in case of a more extensive injury, like a broken bone. Then, follow these 4 steps- moving on once the goal of each step has been achieved. Step 1 - Goal: Control swelling/pain and restore range of motion to 50%. Duration:

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16 BenchMark Therapists Earn Advanced Certifications

BenchMark Rehab Partners, regarded by physicians and patients throughout the nation for their highly-skilled physical and occupational therapists and superior patient outcomes, is proud to announce that sixteen BenchMark clinicians successfully received certification for their advanced expertise in orthopedics and hand therapy. Studies show that therapists with advanced certifications, like these, get better patient results. BenchMark Rehab Partners is one of the country’s leading physical therapy groups, recognized for expertise in orthopaedic manual therapy and for offering more opportunities for advanced certifications for their therapists because advanced expertise translates into better therapy results. "Physicians recognize that advanced training means better results for their patients,” says David Myers, PT, DPT, OCS, CIMT, ATC, who is a highly credentialed therapist himself. “That’s why BenchMark has more advanced certified therapists than any other provider in the area. Bottom line, our patients feel better and move better, faster.” ADVANCED IN HAND THERAPY Tammy Hopton, clinician at our Young Harris, GA clinic, successfully completed the requirements to earn the title of a certified hand therapist (CHT). Hand therapists focus on the rehabilitation of the upper extremities (hand-to-shoulder) through specialized knowledge of upper extremity function. With a minimum of five years of clinical experience and 4,000+ hours in direct practice in hand therapy and a comprehensive board exam, the clinicians that earn this certification are highly regarded. ADVANCED IN SPINAL MANIPULATIVE THERAPY Alison Rogers, clinician at our Joplin, MO clinic received her advanced certification as a certified spinal manipulative therapist

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